Marketing Defects

A product can also be unreasonably dangerous absent appropriate warnings. If a product could reasonably have been designed with a higher degree of safety, a proper warning will not necessarily convert the unreasonably dangerous product into a safe, nondefective one. An appropriate warning however, can transform certain dangerous products, which would be defective without the warning, into reasonably safe ones. The warning must be thorough and conspicuous, and it must evaluate the magnitude of the risk involved in failing to abide by the manufacturer’s instructions. Failure to warn, or “inadequate warn-ing” cases refer to injuries caused as a result of a product already known to be potentially dangerous which was sold without a proper warning to the consumer. Every product has a potential to be unsafe if it is used incorrectly. Whether a warning is adequate requires weighing all the possible circumstances. Juries are typically left with the task of determining whether a given warning is adequate, appropriate, suitable, or sufficient under the specific facts of a particular case.


Inside Marketing Defects