Implied Warranties

Implied warranties are unspoken, unwritten promises that are created by state law. In consumer product transactions, there are two types of implied warranties: the implied warranty of merchantability and the implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. The implied warranty of merchantability is a merchant’s basic promise that the goods sold will function and have nothing significantly wrong with them. The implied warranty of fitness for a particular purpose is a promise that the seller’s product can be used for some specific purpose. Implied warranties are promises about the condition of products at the time they are sold, but they do not assure that a product will last for a specific length of time. Implied warranties do not cover problems caused by misuse, ordinary wear, failure to follow directions, or improper maintenance. Generally, there is no specified duration for implied warranties under state laws. However, the state statutes of limitations for breach of either an express or an implied warranty are generally four years from date of purchase. This means that buyers have four years in which to discover and seek a remedy for problems that were present in the product at the time it was sold. It does not mean that the product must last for four years. Implied warranties apply only when the seller is a merchant who deals in such goods, not when a sale is made by a private individual.


Inside Implied Warranties